books monthly christmas 2017

The pure Genius of Mr Peter Leslie, who wrote the Sleeve Notes for Mr Acker Bilk and his Paramount Jazz Band - continued...

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George Macdonald Fraser: Flashman

 

 

I remember reading Flashman when it was first published in the 1960s, and it is as funny now as it was back then. This is the first tale in a series that puts Flashman, the cowardly bully from the Rugby school of Tom Brown's Schooldays, into a series of military encounters from which he always emerges unscathed and more often than not highly decorated and feted. Absolutely superb in every way!

 

As is always now the case, it seems, I close the magazine for the month, and thirty brilliant new books arrive on my doorstep! I have earmarked this page, the home page, for those that I simply cannot leave until the November issue, and the rest, many of which are from Casemate publishers, will grace the pages of the next issue. I crave your indulgence on this matter...

 

 

 

 

You are here: Books Monthly The Sleeve Notes of gramophone records by Mr Acker Bilk and His Paramount Jazz Band 

The genius of Peter Leslie... continued

The second EP (Extended Play) record by Mr Acker Bilk and his Paramount Jazz Band I've managed to get hold of is Acker's Away (Columbia 45 RPM extended play record SEG 7940). Here's the track list:

 

 

Side One

Acker's Away (Bilk and Leslie)

Blues for Jimmy (Ory)

 

Side Two

Lastic (Bechet)

East Coast Trot (Cobb)

Recorded: 10th July 1959

 

Personnel

Mr Acker Bilk (clarionet and titular head); Mr J Mortimer (trombone); Mr K Sims (trumpet); Mr R McKay (traps);

Mr  E Price (double bass); Mr R James (tenor banjo)

 

And here are the sleeve notes:

 

Inscribed by Mr Peter Leslie

The truncated version of that mammoth Tome, The Encyclopaedia of Mr Webster, lists the Clarionet baldly as 'a Reed instrument fashioned of Wood, with Holes and Keys' - a saucy abbreviation of what should have been more properly an Encomium, a Penegyric in praise of the Effulgence of that melodically Anastomose Instrument. Certain it is that this slender Engine of chromatic Concordance, this symphonious ebon Shaft, this suave Insinuator of Melodies to convolve and wreathe their Way to the very Centre of our pleasure-loving Souls, cannot have justice done to its Elegance in the mere Employment of Words. 'To hear', as a celebrated French Divine has truly remarked, 'is to know' - and of no Sound is this more veritable than the sonorous, reedy depths of the Clarionet.

 

Add to this (in point of the Phonograph Recording to which these poor Aphorisms apply) one fact: that the Airs - Ay, and the Graces, too! - in this especial Example devolve around the person and the Craft of no less able an Exponent than Mr Acker Bilk!! This realized, the Initiate will subside against the Cushions of his Chesterfield and await the Ultimate in musical Enlightenment. He will not long remain disappointed. Mr B is a very Toff of the Entertainent World. Hereupon, encouraged in his Endeavours by that most antic Ensemble, the Paramount Jazz Men, the doughty Leader bends to his Will the exigencies of four titillating Trifles. Of these, the First and the Last would seem to be informed with a Nautical Flavour; Mr Bilk proving himself in the former (if the Conceit be allowed) a true Swell. The remaining Duo comprise a Variety of Folksong deriving from the Southern among the United States of America, and a Novelty from the Pen of the late Parisian Master, Monsieur Sidney Bechet.

 

The Numidian Princess Sophonisba (in the Tragedy written in 1762 by Mr James Thomson), despite the fact that

      'Soon the remorseless Soldier comes, more fierce

      'From recent Blood, and 'fore her very Soul,

      'Lays raging his rude sanguinary grasp'

 

was able to console herself for the Fall of Carthage by 'burying her sorrows in the mufick of the fpheres'. Who can doubt that the Musick of the Spheres, along with the Syrynx Pipes of the God Pan, the Melodies of the Immortals even on Olympus itself, all sound in their ineffable, reeded Harmony akin to the Clarionet of Mr Acker Bilk?

 

Sleeve Design: Ian Bradbery

Sleeve Photography: Patrick G Gwynn-Jones

Recording Balance: Joe Meek Supervision: Denis Preston

 

During my youth I collected anything and everything I could to do with Acker Bilk - it was the era when "trad jazz" ruled the Hit Parade, and Acker Bilk had recently transferred from the Pye Jazz label to EMI Records, and a new photographer, Patrick Gwynn-Jones had been appointed, along with a publicist, Peter Leslie, who came up with the idea of dressing the Paramount Jazz Band in smart, fancy waistcoats and bowler hats. Overnight, the sleeve notes became something quite extraordinary - while most EPs and LPs simply carried the track listing - two tracks on side A, two on side B of an EP, for example, now Acker's EPS and LPs carried long, beautifully written essays. I have searched the web for many years trying to find examples of Peter Leslie's writing, and the only pertinent reference that I can find is my own review of The Book of Bilk, a collection of essays by Leslie featuring various characters from history, like Johann Sebastian Bilk, Pithecus Ackerectus etc., etc. It is a work of genius, the work of a genius, and it is important that these sleeve notes should be available to read on the web, which is why I have started to collect Acker's EPs and LPs, the first of which you see above. I don't have a record player to play them on, but they are things of beauty, and of great joy, as you will discover. Below are the sleeve notes for Acker Volume One, the track listing of which is as follows:

 

Side One

Snake Rag (Oliver)(a)

Fandy (sic) Pants (Bilk and Berkwood)(b) [Should be "fancy" pants]

 

Side Two

Original Dixieland One Step (La Rocca)(b)

Good Night, Sweet Prince (b)

 

Personnel

Mr Acker Bilk (Clarionet and Master Mind). Mr Kenneth Sims (Trumpet). Mr Jonathan Mortimer (Trombone). Mr Ronald McKay (Tambours, Traps and Effects). Mr Ernest Price (Double Bass). Mr Roy James (Tenor Banjo). (a) Recorded 7:4:60; (b) Recorded 13:4:60.

 

Sleeve notes:

MR ACKER BILK, in expressing the fond and pious Hope that the Listener has enjoyed, read, marked, learned, inwardly digested and, indeed, profited from the gentle Ballads performed hereon, begs leave to draw the Attention of the Same to others of his Works obtainable under the same distinguished Trade Mark, viz.:-

Discs designed to revolve at a Speed of Thirty-three and One-Third Revolutions the Minute and of One Dozen Inches Diameter:

The Seven Ages of Acker (33SX 3321 stereo), A Golden Treasury of Bilk (33SX 1304 Mono); SCX 3366 stereo), Clarinet Jamboree (part only)(33SX 1204).

The Same, restricted to a Diameter of but Ten Inches:

The Noble Art of Mr Acker Bilk (33S 1141)

Discs to revolve at no less than 45 Revolutions the Minute, yet possessing a Diameter of no more than Seven Inches:

Acker's Away ! (SEG 7904), The Seven Ages of Acker - Volume One (SEG 8029), The Seven Ages of Acker - Volume Two (SEG 8076).

 

I had all of these Gramophone Records and many more besides. I followed Mr Acker Bilk around the West Country from 1960-1963, when we left Brockworth Gloucester, and went to live for six months in Prittlewell, near Southend-on-Sea, and thence to Stevenage New Town. I had them all, and divested myself of them when new Audio Technology manifested itself in the form of firstly, Cassettes, and secondly, CDs. I now own all the main Acker Bilk CDs that are available, but transference to CD, whilst enhancing the Quality of the Sound Reproduction, has omitted to reproduce the Sleeve Notes. In recent days I have managed to get hold of a copy of the Acker's Away ! EP, and the Stranger On The Shore LP, and the Sleeve Notes for these two will appear in the next two Issues of Books Monthly. I hope you enjoy reading the amazing Words compiled by Peter Leslie - his idea it was to dress Acker and his players in smart, fancy Waistcoats and Bowler Hats. It was an act of Genius, matched only by his Genius with words. I still have my copy of The Book of Bilk, by the way, bought for me as a Christmas present in 1962 by my sister, Jean. It, too, is a work of Genius, and I will never part with it.

 


The small print: Books Monthly, now well into its twentieth year on the web, is published on or slightly before the first day of each month by Paul Norman. You can contact me here. If you wish to submit something for publication in the magazine, let me remind you there is no payment as I don't make any money from this publication. If you want to send me something to review, contact me via email and I'll let you know where to send it.